rusty-patch-bumblebees-recommended-to-be-an-endangered-species

Rusty patch bumblebees recommended to be an endangered species.

in Environmental/Freshest News by

US Fish and Wildlife Service recommended rusty patched bumblebees be considered as an endangered species.

  • The species of bee is said to have vanished from 90% of their historic range in the last 20-years.

  • Multiple problems are causing bumblebees around the nation to vanish.

  • In Canada the rusty patched bumblebee is already on the endangered species list.

Rusty patch bumblebees have been recommended to be listed as an endangered species by federal officials.

The recommendation follows a large percentage of the bumble bee population no longer being seen grazing in 90% of their historic range. The bumblebees have disappeared from these areas at this significantly alarming rate in only the last twenty years.

The Xerces Society first petitioned for the bumblebee in 2013.

The Xerces Society, out of Portland, Oregan, petitioned the agency in regards to the bumblebee back inĀ  2013. The reasons behind the lack of bumblebees that the Xerces Society discovered were disturbing, to say the least.

There is not one reason in particular that is exterminating the rusty patched bumblebee. It is a combination of disease, loss of natural habitat, climate change, and the dousing commercial crops in pesticides.

The rusty patched bumblebee would be the first bee in America labeled as endangered.

If the recommendation is passed, the rusty patch bumblebee will be the first bee listed as endangered in the United States. In Canada, bumblebees are already on the endangered species list.

The rusty patched bumblebee is just one of 4,000 native bees in the North American area. Due to the large size of the rusty patched bumblebee, they play a significant role in pollinating cranberries, blueberries, and tomatoes.

The rusty patched is not the only bumblebee that is facing possible extinction. Franklin’s Bumblebee, a native of California and Oregan, is listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

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