9 Foot Long Crotchet Falkor Goes Viral On Facebook

A 9-foot-long crotchet Falkor went viral on Facebook leaving people wondering where to get one

  • Shaylynn Marie posted pictures of the Luckdragon to a crochet and knitting group on Facebook

  • The post was shared almost 60,000 tomes since it was posted

  • Marie made the gift for her friend’s son Atreyu for his first birthday

A viral post on Facebook shows a 9-foot-long crochet recreation of the Falkor the Luckdragon from The Neverending Story. The post has been shared almost 60,000 times since it was posted.

Shalynn Marie posted the images to the Facebook group, “Yarn Wars FREE Crochet & Knit Community,” on May 21. It was from this group that the yarn Falkor grabbed viral attention. The caption with the three images reads as follows.

I can finally share one of my proudest creations! Life sized luckdragon, falkor! 27 days to create, 12 pounds of yarn, 10 pounds of fluff, 5 sheets of felt, 4 days of brushing, 9 feet long, all for 1 special 1st birthday for a ill little boy

Many have wondered how to get their own life-sized Falkor from Marie. Unfortunately, this Luckdragon is one of a kind. In one of the images, a young boy is seen riding on Falkor’s back. That child’s name is Atreyu and Falkor is Marie’s homemade first birthday present to him. At one point it was thought Atreyu would not make it to his first birthday.

Atreyu is no ordinary child, as he was born with Gastroschisis according to a post from his mother Lacey Deemer made on July 7, 2017. Deemer made the post to the Facebook group, “Atreyu’s Never Ending Story.” A group devoted to following Atreyu’s story.

Hey guys and gals, I have a favor to ask of you. If you know of anyone that has delt with Gastroschesis, please add them to this group. I have been looking into Gastroschesis support groups, and just poking around to see what others have to say about their experiences. I am seeing a lot of different groups, and lots of amazing stories as well as heartbreaking ones. There was one that really caught my eye called Avery’s Angels. A little boy named Avery was born April 14th, 2009. And although his journey ended July 30th, 2009, his story lives on through a foundation that his parents founded. While reading about this sweet angel, I realized I have no idea whether or not there are any local support systems for families that are dealing with this condition. So now I am determined to do some research (something I try to avoid with this unless necessary in order to keep my wits about it all) and find other people that could share their stories. With Atreyu’s case being so uncommon, it would be great to be able to talk to other families that know what we are going through. So please, help us get the word out about Atreyu’s Never Ending Story so that we can connect with other families 😊 And Thank you all for taking the time to read what I post about our handsome little man ❤💙💚💛💜 Love to you all 💜💛💚💙❤

And of course, here are a few of my favorite pics from yesterday and today. This morning Atreyu went for another dye test. Dr. Relles wanted to see how well the dye traveled as well as how far now that the bowels are reconnected. The dye traveled all throughout his intestines, but it moved very slowly, which we now understand is the reason why the drainage from his feeding tube hasn’t stopped yet. Dr. Relles and his colleagues have been trying to get Atreyu to keep the drainage, which is mucus and bile, inside his tummy so that his bowels can process it. But since his bowels are moving very slowly, it makes it difficult for him to do so, and every so often he ends up spitting up the built up mucus when his feeding tube is clamped. So, the next step is for Atreyu to get an antibiotic called Erythromycin, which along with having the ability to treat different infections, it can also be used as a gut motility stimulator. What we are hoping for is that this antibiotic will help his bowels pick up the pace and get the digestive track working a little better so that he can finally start the eating process. So fingers crossed that it works! But other that that he’s doing pretty well. His wound is healing little by little, which is great. He has also started back up with his Tpn cycling last night. When the nurse checked his sugar, it was 51. The cutoff is 50, so even if it’s just slightly above, we will take it! Hopefully he will be able to keep passing so the cycling can continue since it helps give his liver a break. When Atreyu isn’t sleeping, he’s usually just chillin in his bed or swing, looking around and smiling up a storm. He loves to watch Mike and Sully on his Monsters Inc Mobile, and listening to the music that his Owl night light plays. He melts my heart 💚

Gastroschisis is a birth defect of the abdominal wall which causes the intestines to be outside of the body. The intestines exit the body through a hole next to the belly button that can be small or large, and at times can have other organs coming out of the body as well.

Atreyu’s Luckdragon received enough attention that Marie also made a post to her personal page explaining that the Luckdragon was made specifically for Atreyu.

For those that would like to follow the story & adventures of the 9 foot Luckdragon inspired by Falkor and his owner, the amazing brave little Atreyu ( pictured below) Please join the group Atreyus Neverending Story.. you will see why this little fellow who has overcome so many odds, is beyond deserving of a custom creation that he will forever be able to ride on 💙💙💙💙💙💙💙

( I did want to clarify that the Luckdragon was NOT created for my grandson, and we no longer have possession of him, so please follow Atreyu’s (adventure!)

Unfortunately if you run across this viral Falkor recreation on social media, you cannot get one of your own. Marie appears to be standing her ground and keeping the Luckdragon as a one of a kind gift for Atreyu’s first birthday. Sorry Neverending Story fans, but here are some pictures of the crochet Falkor and Atreyu enjoying him.

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About Meko Haze

Meko Haze is an independent journalist by day... and an independent journalist by night.

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